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with the disconnect that i was alluding to earlier between how science deals with this question and how lawyers deal with this question is that you actually get a fundamental disconnect between the two systems. so you mentioned that lack of emotional control or lack of ability to control your preferences might lead to insanity, but, in fact, in most jurisdictions as you know, that's not true. after hanky was acquitted under the american law institute test because he could not control his behavior, congress in most state jurisdictions changed the law, got rid of the lack of emotional test, the a.l.i. test and now in most jurisdictions, the nontest requires that you demonstrate that you can't distinguish right from wrong. so now we have, and again, the law uses science for the law's own purposes, but what is problematic here is the disconnect. from the criminal side, if you lack emotional control, you go to prison because you can't win under the test because the test doesn't apply. when you walk out of prison and you lack emotional control, you get civilly committed. so what we have is a fundamental d
and technology intervention and art and science. which no other primate has done. there are simple examples of primates creating tools or using language but not in this indefinitely expanded hierarchical fashion that humans do. >> host: you are thinking of the main functions of the neocortex as high level functions such as decisionsmaking, inhibiting improper action, not so much -- see neocortex as a huge number of things. >> guest: it does lots of things that high and low levels using the same algorithms. lot of pattern recognizers like the edges of objects or the capital wa and all these primitive functions. it is a high-level conceptual hierarchy. one powerful piece of evidence that came out as i was sending this to the publisher is what happens to the region of the neocortex ready optic words ago? it is very primitive pattern like the edges of objects. it is low level, very simple pattern. what happens to it? a blind person who is not getting any visual information, actually gets taken over by the frontal cortex to help process high-level language concepts. here is the same region doing
transforming experiences for readers. carson had only taken science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spring" is a disturbing book, a worrisome book to point that what we were doing to ourselves by the careless use of pesticides in many different places. since it's not 1962 anymore, i thought i would explain more for you about who rachel carson was. she was born in 1907 in the house in springfield, pennsylvania. when a person was born in the upstairs bedroom of the house, at the time did not have the addition on the brick inside. very simple, very modest house, four runs. two downstairs and two bedrooms upstairs. there is no central heat, no indoor plumbing. data couple of couple of outhouses out that. a shed in the front of vacation i kept it worse and there was a little bit out of the west.??? there is enough property around the house that carson could explore the woods, often with her mother as a child and she looke
's health and science editor john fowler live now with the beginnings of a levy repair. john? >> reporter: state crews have moved us back from the levy here anticipating that trucks will arrive here momentarily to begin sand bagging. this video now. you can see the creek is much comer than last -- calmer than last might. they worked fast to get this temporary fix underway. >> reporter: not fast enough for residents who lived through repeated flooding here. >> i am worried because it is supposed to rain tomorrow. >> reporter: homeowners cleared mud and debris from the flood. >> like a big lake. lot of trees going down. garbage. >> reporter: the creek topped the levy. 7 homes damaged. several hundred people evacuated. >> having a levy failure here would be catastrophic. >> reporter: as you see that failure began last night. our cameras caught water bubbling through. today officials took an emergency survey. last night's creek flow was the third highest since the levy was built 82 years ago. >> not certified. not in good shape. they will start next year to rebuild the whole system. >> report
unhelpful concept and i think that you have to ask the question from the legal system and from the science perspective as to what free will might mean. on the science side, the question really is, and this is what we were debating, is the question whether you can operationally define free will so you can measure it? from a scientist's standpoint, a construct doesn't really mean anything if you can't measure it. i have been asked many, many newer scientists including ken, what exactly does free will mean and how do you measure it? it could be like emotional control. it could be something like impulsivity, impulse control and you get back to the basic problem that chris who is a colleague of anita's at vanderbilt, wait he has put it, how do you distinguish and irresistible impulse from an impulse not resisted. there is a basic gray area, a difficult ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competen
are three key ethical -- the first one is this. i do not think that there is any legitimate basis in science, medicine, or any ethical code that i know of or the bible, for that matter for our criminal law tdistinguishing between those wo have alcohol and tobacco and people who put other substances in their body. there is no legitimate basis for distinguishing between the alcoholic on the one hand under criminal law and between the drug addict on the other. that is first. the second ethical point is i hope most of you agree with this. i do not believe that anybody should be punished simply for what we put into our own bodies absent harm to others. nobody deserves to be punished for what we put in our bodies absent harm to others. hurt somebody, yes and not tell me your addiction was the excuse. we need to be regarded as sovereign over our minds and bodies. the criminal law should not be treating anyone as a criminal for what we put in here. when one is trying to pursue a particular public health or public safety objective, reducing the harm of drugs or whatever it might be. and when you have
in the christian science monitor noted that when he passed in the street, the young men would call out, hello, chris. they knew his face. would laugh and say hello always. this is the right way to deal with our people, he said. libyan friends said he was always ready to put his country first. he shone by being himself, interested in the lives of ordinary people. his death was met with shock and sadness in libya. feelings with regard to americans that are rare in that part of the world these days. for me that judgment captures key characteristics of chris and his approach to life and work. secretary of state hillary clinton noted chris's swearing in as ambassador to libya on an earlier tour, he was visiting roman ruins at one of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced the
brother is upset about financial disclosure that if there is money to be made it by science. but we want to kill each other and my colleagues will run over their grandmother for the advancement. [laughter] >> absolutely. there is not very many rich scientist. you have your place in fame but it is the discovery. john: why don't people know about anarchy? >> it to tries to make itself look good. looking at the atomic bomb, experiments on prisoners of four it is in the name of science. the scientist for trusted they made sure they did not do anything to scare the public fish show thmselves as trustworthy. we will not blow up the world. john: even know about -- albert einstein. >> i thought he proved the theory of relativity. >> he was brilliant. >> = mcs glared? >> not qui einstein. he owned it and tried to prove it eight times and he even wrote that in the footnotes. let's go on anyway. his colleagues in new this. he covered every other thing in science but he left out the equals mc squared out. that shows you how he felt. >> i don't think we john: do you cheat? ever? never? you lied to be
rate of spending were less than the science of our bloated government. the answer in tonight "chalk talk" is coming up so, this board gives me rates for progressive direct and other car insurance companies? yes. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. lou: you know, everybody's getting pretty excited about that fiscal cliff negotiation or impasse, however you want to3 style it. mayi want t showu, lou: everybody is getting re ofed about the fiscal clifft, negotiation. i thought i would show you what thuld happen if we change into the speaker boehner plan, the president obama plan, let's start out with the do-nothing plan because that's the plan we0 have right now. the cbo estimates fiscal year 2013 deficit will be, well,lionf $104 trillion for fiscal year al 2013.well, it's so we get up to 2014, it is going to
master it." "it is almost a science, and yet if is a puzzle without an answer. it requires complete concentration and total relaxation. it satisfies the soul, fortifies the intellect. it is at the same time, rewarding and frustrating." mr. palmer, we had your golf partner's statute shipped in here, too. i think he just dropped the potter. -- putter. [laughter] i thought -- i am not a great golfer, but as a psychologist, i understand the psychology of the sport in that sense. and i thought, since there's probably one our two call first -- golfers here, i can probably pass on to you what i think is the greatest golf device ever, and it is a story about mr. palmer and the manager of the detroit tigers. i was having dinner with jim, who is also known to have a colorful word or two when he speaks, and he told me about a round of golf he was playing with arnold palmer. he was chipping everywhere but the affair with. -- but the fairway. i am sure that he had a word or two. after a few holes or so, mr. palmer said to him "jim, which you like a little advice?" think about that. if any of us
. the government-affiliated chinese academy of social sciences released its assessment of the international situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the senkaku, apparently to jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it further. china-japan relations, as well as northeast asia's security instability will face difficult challenges. analysts said the report is thought to be aimed at thwarting further moves of the president to be inaugerated this week. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of pug. he is known as an expert in economic policy. >> clie chinese leaders are wary of the incoming government. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of park. he is known as a
and steady passions and interests, to that extent, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, w
. the government-affiliated chinese academy of social sciences released its assessment of the analyst situation in a report on monday. referring to the budget in japan, they reported china-japan is in the worst state. it adds that tensions could be eased through diplomatic channels. china has repeatedly sent ships into japanese waters around the sonkuku, apparently to jeopardi jeopardize japan and to recognize that opposition exists. china says japan's stubborn position could push it further. china-japan relations, as well as northeast asia's security instability will face difficult challenges. analysts said the report is thought to be aimed at thwarting further moves of the president to be inaugerated this week. >>> park began picking her team of aides and advisers. lawmaker yohuhu is her chief of staff. the 67-year-old yu is an ally of pug. he is known as an expert in economic policy. park says pug will play a strong role at shaping foreign policy. she also named yun as her spokesperson. yun is vice president of the newspaper and television association. he studied at tokyo's ko university. pu
science professor who left the year before i arrived to work on a phd in east ucla. his parents had been on the faculty at aup and though he had made a very distinguished career for himself in the united states as a scholar in the middle east, gila home to leave the school during the difficult time when beirut had fractured civil war and the israeli incursion of 1982. the city was a mess. the school is under assault. he believed that going back and running the school and providing leadership at a time of crisis was the best thing to do for an institution that is loved and he gave his life to the school was assassinated in january of 9094. >> by who and how? >> most likely by the fanatical wing of hezbollah, a group known as islamist jihads the comprised lebanese shia who had historically been underprivileged, excluded from the politics and economics of the country, had ideological affinity for the regime in iran, from 1979 and have been radical in the israeli purge to lebanon in the 1980s. there is a very toxic mix that let them should make steps the climax of the assassination of malcol
for $49.99. the stuff of science fictio the test. the private space flight company successful . >>> company space eex is testing a rocket. they successfully conducted a test flight of its reusable rocket. this is in texas. the rocket lifted off -- touchdown on the launching pad. they said it's almost ready for its first real lift off. they will save a lot of money. >>> netflix users, i got good news for us. you are in luck. the streaming video service is back online following a christmas eve outage. on its twitter page they blamed amazon's cloud for the problem. wire magazine reports it's the third time this year that an amazon outage has disrupted netflix. they are back online. >>> coming up, santa that prefers a snow board instead. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, need a sleigh to cut a pathn the mountain in steamboat springs, colorado... he bro his snowboard! and even thoh he didn't deliver any prese, he brought lots of smiles te . >>> a man brought his snow board and even though he didn't bring presents's brought a lot of smiles to the skiers who stopped to watch him catch some air. h
with like science experiments. >> eye on the bay produce california cities sandra murray -- producer sandra murray discovered it while doing a news segment. forget about rush delivery. simply email or print the ecard and your gift is ready to go. >> by creating electricity from the heat of the fire it can charge your phone, light or other gadgets. >> it gain popularity following hurricane sandy enabling those without power to charge their phone without fire. it is also back ordered and comes with a ding staff gift tag for last minute holiday orders. and, finally, like a juicer but better. justed a frozen bananas and you have a healthy snack with no sugar, milk or added calories. it was a hit in the newsroom. now, it cost about 50 bucks. target stays open until 9:00. so, rush out and grab it now if you want it. >>> if the weather keeps up we will need one of those bio lights. >> reporter: we have a lot of nasty weather. calmer weather towards christmas. outside, the south bay, our view, we had a mostly sunny day. the beautiful bay bridge on christmas eve. these are your temperatures outside
the museum and the california academy of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus
. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes.
a greater pain tolerance, the documented science regarding that point is inconclusive what is ininclusive is the severe threat to their vital health that is posed by tasing such an individual. >> three, in portland just a few weeks ago, a settlement was reached after a september department of justice decision against the portland police for the misuse of tasers, specifically against people with mental elth issues. the plea bargain will cost 5.4 million annually including cit and including housing and treatment. and including 180 day deadline for internal affairs and a limit for complaints against the police must be heard. >> number 4 is that the lawsuits will happen. the draft policy i have read over the police draft policy multiple times and they do not cover the recent ninth circuit decisions they do not cover the holes in the law where san francisco would be liable and 9th circuit has heard by far the majority of the cases 190, cases that is 27.4 percent of all federal cases. >> thanks. >> national population. >> thank you. >> finally. >> could you share with us your 5 and 6 briefly. >
issues. gang violence and brain science and crime, these are issues at the forefront and deserve all of our attention. this is a greatat>> your going p with me because i liked to wander around and see faces. you have learned more about me that a lot of people know. for the last 10 years i have been married to someone who was a deputy chief of the lapd and i now refer to him as being in recovery. at the same time, i have been working extensively with home with industries, and my brother said, if he had dreamed i would be married to a policeman and working with a priest, somebody would be lying. i have been working with gangs and been involved with gangs, trying to figure them out for 34 years. i began as a young social worker in south los angeles. with gang infested housing projects that are now almost mythic, jordan downs and nickerson gardens, and i worked in these projects during what is referred to as the decade of death, when crack and unregulated gun availability laid waste to communities of color. in los angeles during the late 1980's and early 1990's, there were 1000 homicides
what this does for this region. you know the bay area has become the blue angels of science. we do lots of stunts, and we are very successful at doing those stunts and we do them at high speeds, and between this project and the project for cal train to electifiy it over the next seven years $3 billion is going to be spent regionally on transit here, and we can say thank you to the secretary of transportation and to the regional transit authorities who have create thursday opportunity for the transportation. >> >> that will create a 22nd century of transit for the tronst century of jobs so thank you to secretary lahood and thank you to the leadership for all that we have accomplished here today. [applause] >> peter rogof was dominated to serve in the federal administration by the department of transportation in 2009 by president barack obama. he has over see the disbursement throughout the country through the american reinvestment act and has done so meeting every milestone established by that act. getting money into hands of transit operators whose budgets were severely strained
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged ought what he was doing. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should be free to be married like a straight man or woman? what
thaict history and social science. it's a date predates the idea there is a thing of social ions. if you go back to later the idea that social forces are what really explain human outcomes. the people were there, which different people died of heart attack and replaced by someone else. what happens the stuff that mattered would have ended up being about the same. marx famously make argument of napoleon. in the essay in theory about louis that poll began. it's not about him. it's about the class struggle of the social forces. it's become a history or political science without proper nouns. no people involved. car legal takes the most extreme opposite position. history is nothing but the biography of great men. it's caricatured as a after anothermen. you cannot get further apart in the view of the world than these two. both arguments make sense. the social scientist following in the tradition of, you know, not just marx but social scientists say there are three reasons why leaders don't matter that much. that the leader of any organization faces external constraint. if you are a ceo of a c
the jobs act replaces green card lottery to permanent visas to those with doctorates in science, technology, engineering and math. two outgoing republican senators introducing legislation granting residence to those bought in the country illegally. though call it the achieve act, similar to the d.r.e.a.m. act. i spoke to one. bill's cosponsors, senator kay bailey hutchison. welcome to you here. how is your legislation different than the d.r.e.a.m. act? >> our legislation gives legal status to the young people in conundrum. they have grown up here. this is the country they know yet they are illegal because their parents brought them here before they were 14 years old. but we don't go into a citizenship track. we allow them to get in line behind the people who have been lawful and waited in line. so we don't give them a preference in line but we do give them a legal status and we don't prohibit them from getting in line if they choose to go the citizenship route. gerri: senator, what do you have to have to be able to be part of the program as you're defining it? >> you have to be under 14 whe
in good standing, has the assumption that as science, rationalism, and the rationality of society advances, the disenchantment of the world proceeds apace, forces will lose their history shaping saliency. the two biggest forces are religion and ethnicity. everyday, in every region, people refute this. religion, and especially religion entangled with reinforcing ethnicity, still drive histoes history. religion is also central to america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending the specialists, let me offer a brief placement of america's founders in the stream of world political philosophy. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. his is a demarcation between the ancients and the moderns. the ancients took their political bearings from their understanding of the best of which people were capable. they sought to and large the likelihood of the emergence of fine and noble leaders. and the fine and noble attributes among them. machiavelli took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew, almost t
of choice meaning they kind of look like they are science science-fiction and that is deliberate. they are sort of modeled after science-fiction in order to appeal to the network engineers that are deciding where to put their network connections and where to connect to other networks. so when you walk and it's a bit like walking into a machine. their buildings inside are incredibly loud but incredibly cold from all the air-conditioners to keep the equipment cool. hugh also have a heated ceiling to obscure cables and there usually cages around, big steel cages maybe half the size of the hotel room and each belongs to network and that is where they keep their equipment securely and then run a wire to the top of the cage and drop it down into the cage of another network and interconnected that way. that is the physical internet connection and the internet world. >> host: when you look at the infrastructure of the wires of the internet, what did our those wires made of and what are they carrying? >> guest: predominantly the centers of the internet, the most important places, they are
expectancy. it was, and still is, an assumption that as science and the rationality -- as the disenchantment of the world's, pre-modern forces will lose their history. the two most important of these are religion. events refute the liberal expectancy. religion still drives history. religion is also central to the emergence of america's public philosophy. at the risk of offending specialists by distortion through compression, what we offer a very brief placement of americans foundries. machiavelli begins modern political philosophy. this spot is a convenient demarcation. the agents -- ancients saw to enlarge the likelihood of the emergence of noble leaders. machiavelli, however, took his bearings from people as they are. he defined the political project as making the best of this flawed material. he knew that nothing would ever be made from the crooked timber of humanity. machiavelli was no democrat. he reoriented politics towards accommodations, strong and predictable forces rising from a great constant, human nature common to all people in all stations. for 44 years, machiavelli and luther
. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, including one in western new york, where an attacker lay in wait for a fire crew. >> responding firefighters when they pulled up on the scene started receiving -- were fired upon. >> police speaking shortly after a home and car erupted in flames. it was arson they said later that turned out to be an ambush. >> it does appear that it was a trap that was set. for responding first responders. >> gunmen killed two volunteer firefighters and wounded two others then killed himself. police identified him as william sp
from the body. and the irony in fact, the tragedy is that now we have the western science that shows, incontrovertibly and in great detail, that mind and body can't be separated, and so that any attempt to do so leaves the medical practitioner short of many tools to help clients. and, of course, it leaves patients short of what they need for their own healing. the point now is that the emotional centers of the brain, which regulate our behaviors and our responses and our reactions, are physiologically connected with and we know exactly how they're connected with the immune system, the nervous system and the hormonal apparatus. in fact, it's no longer possible, scientifically, to speak of these as separate systems, as if immunity was separate from emotions, as if the nervous system was separate from the hormonal apparatus. there's one system, and they're wired together by the nervous system itself and joined together by chemical messengers that they all secrete, and so that whatever happens emotionally has an impact immunologically, and vice versa. so, for example, we know now that t
, chapter two in my book four or five fields of science. john: how risky is it really? >> what various scientific told us of what our subjective interpretation to come up with judgment of whether risk comes from and one whole field is risk as personality traits to make them feel more or less scary. he points out people are more afraid of some environmental risk than what we need to be. in many cases those risks. john: chemical traces. >> those risks cause cancer. asking those people are you more afraid of cancer than heart disease i bet most of their hands would go up because it has the characteristics involving more pain and suffering. doesn't make emotional sense to me more afraid of what is nastier. regardless of what the odds say. by the way it drives policy of the federal government spends way more research on the number two cause of death, cancer than the national institute of health. john: the reason is sometimes it seems more important than the risk. here's one woman's explanation why she serve fears terrort or n car crash. >> they want me dead. with a car crash nobody is tryin
science in his videos are viewed millions of time. >> natalee reaching millions of students by god forbid if i am hits by eight of the us you coulstill reach millions of students. >> you are just good at teaching? >> it is a complement. >> he is a great teacher. >> it is really helping us learn. >> it is exciting he gets kids so excited. >> in most parts of life things have gotten better. cellphones, computers, educa tion and not so much. >> after 90 years you have the local band if you had a party that was the only game in town. now you have mass media to say why don't we take the best musicians actors and storytellers and record it to put it out on radio, records and it could have happened with education before. john: even basic math and multiplication tables i thought they would use video games. why not? >> there is a huge bureaucracy to change the system. >> did this the blob and from our point* of view we could reach students outside of the blob. >> this california school district started using his videos in the fifth grade classroom. they were skeptical but now they are impressed. >
that the next storms will be weaker than the last. reporting from east palo alto health and science senator john fowler, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> a christmas gift for convicted criminals tonight. governor jerry brown announced he's granting 79 pardons. the people granted pardons, completed their sentences, have been releaseed from custody for more than a decade and have not committed any further crimes. a governor's pardon restores some rights to a felon like serving on a jury and in some case it is right to own firearms. the pardon does not seal or erase a person's record. if you'd like to see the complete list of pardons, we posted it to ktvu.com under today's hot topics on the home page. >>> government and consumer groups have turned down a settlement offer from pg & e in the wake of the deadly san bruno explosion. the san francisco chronicle reports pg & e aufrd $550 million to pay for skate regulatory charges but the offer was rejected because the utility will not admit to safety breaches. such an admission would open the door to criminal charges. eight people die and had 38 homes were dest
leukemia. does that make a more uncertain morence? >> not only a more uncertain scie science, we actually lose ten uncrs. en reporter: and the down side of turning off a variety of experiments is what? >> we've killed innovation because the most innovative becaus projects are the projects that will go first. >> reporter: the pending budget cuts have also forced labs to etow down the hiring of promising younger scientists. >> turning them down because i have to say to them "in all honesty, i don't know whether i can take you on. on that four to five-year commitment." >> reporter: the n.i.h. hopes to restore the lost 10% if the ifncy's funding is restored, but this is one danger from the anscal cliff that isn't waiting for new year's day. the reduction in medical experiments and the hold on ingoratory jobs is happening now. wyatt andrews, cbs news, wy washington. ghanlor: in afghanistan, another insider attacked today and for inside first tt time the attacker was ackefghan woman. a police sergeant. she shot and killed an american contractor inside a compound in rabul that houses police head
the healing properties and the science behind the nopal cactus, i knew we had to make it trivita's top priority and bring this product to market. we had to get this super fruit, used by the desert natives for hundreds of years, to the many people who are suffering today from symptoms caused by inflammation. >> i couldn't walk without excruciating pain. being physically fit has always been very important to me, but i had to give up my treadmill workouts. i even had to switch to comfort shoes. i started on nopalea during the product's trial period without much hope, but after just six weeks on nopalea i was almost pain-free, and after eight weeks the redness and swelling was completely gone. today i am back in the gym on my treadmill pain-free and power shopping wearing stylish shoes and loving it. i know that pain can rob you of quality of life. if you have inflammatory pain issues, i would encourage you to give nopalea a chance. >> it's incredible that something as yummy and natural as nopalea got me on my feet again. now my energy is back, i sleep more soundly and so, really, i just f
this multinational. >> yes, tom, sound like it belongs in the medical business, but actually no it's really a science business. core labs, about a $5 billion company and they specialize in helping oil companies find more oil and more gas that benefits all around the world. so they have scientists who actually take samples of rock and water, analyze that and try to help oil companies find more oil that may be hidden or tucked away so we can abscess more oil, which is good for all of us. >> tom: we're talking about an energy boon in the united states, energy prices, that's helped keep a cap on energy prices here. what kind of holding time frame do you anticipate to make some money? >> as we've seen this year, one reason why core labs is attractive from a valuation perfect suspective we've seen the stock soften this year as some of the rig counts have softened as well because of the i prices of natural gas have really fallen. and i do think this will reverse sometime over the next few years and we'll see more rigs be put to use, and that's good for core labs, but to do that you really need to take that
, whether it was my dad who loves to cook to my little 7-year-old nephew who is obsessed with science. >> a segment on the creator. because the hot item is back ordered, forget about rush deliverly. print the ecard and your gift is ready to go. >> it can charge your phone, light or other gadgets. >> the bio light camp stove gained popularity after hurricane sandy enabling people to charge their phones. great for anyone who lives in earthquake country. it is also back ordered and comes with a digital gift tag for last minute holiday orders. >> finally, a juicer but better. no sugar, milk or added calories. we have a variety of recipes. it was a hit in the newsroom. >> cost about $50. you can find it at a variety of retailers. unfortunately, the only one you may still be able to get to is target which stays open until 9:00. julie watts, cbs 5. >>> still to come, the bay area clinic helping people what happened injuries get back on the -- hand injuries get back on the job. >>> plus, how you can track santa from the palm of your hand. >>> it is a special day tomorrow. we have a special ty
and science editor john fowler ktvu channel 2 news. >>> crews clearing mud and debris from a sliding hillside in oakland. the pile of mud started coming down this morning and left debris in the street. one lane was closed while crews worked in the area. >>> significant rain yesterday. you saw it coming down hard for a time. these are some of the totals sunday. the rain dumping. almost 3 inches of rain. bolder creek, half foot of rain, 5 inches of rain. redwood city. looks like we will see more showers tomorrow. what i am tracking is this next weather system. nice looking system but nothing like what we saw. it will get in here tomorrow and bring rain. when i get back, i will break down the timing and we will go through it hour by hour so you can plan out your day. but the showers will be there. see you back here in a bit. >>> and we want to report breaking news to you. these are live pictures from news chopper 2. a number of emergency vehicles on the road, this is highway 84. near 680. and we understand right now we are hearing there are possible injuries in an accident, a head on collision b
, the deadline from. while the specific day is not based on science, this is not an arbitrary deadline, we need to make a decision around that time if we're going to do something other than, other than the base case. i would suggest that, if i might , perhaps the wording of the resolution to address what i think is a very clear issue of trust be something along the lines that if we're not able to achieve option 4, that we return to you on the meeting of february 5th, which would be coincidentally on february 1st to explain where we are. >> i personally would have no objection to that. and just to be clear, is it -- the decision under option 4 need to be made by february or all of the preconditions that we've talked about need to be sewed up? i mean, i realize there can be a point in january where it all looks like it's lining up and you and the agency decide, we're going forward with option 4, subject to some contingencies. and if those go bad, it has the negative impacts you talked about. but i think the concern from the community that we're in
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